Understanding Musical Ecosystems – and other news of the week

THE WEEKLY DIGEST

FEATURE: UNDERSTANDING MUSICAL ECOSYSTEMS

Written by Huib Schippers at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

We are living in a time when many music cultures are in a critical state of survival in terms of support, exposure, prestige, transmission processes, and infrastructure. This is the time for all of us who love, make, or work in music to collaborate with communities across the world to empower them to forge musical futures on their own terms.

Deborah Borda’s Message to Curtis Grads
Philadelphia Enquirer: Peter Dobrin
Deborah Borda, who leaves as president and CEO of the Los Angeles Philharmonic to take the same spot at the New York Philharmonic Sept. 15, told Saturday’s audience of students, parents, faculty, and guests that “everything I took for granted as a musician first and then managing America’s great orchestras has changed.

Björk’s Words of Wisdom on Technology, Multitasking, and Collaboration

Pitchfork: Alex Frank
A cult superstar since her progressive Debut nearly a quarter-century ago, Björk now seems to have one eye on the past and one on the future. One view finds her diving headfirst into the tricky world of virtual reality more boldly than anyone else in music. The other sees her offering fans a thoughtful look at her own archive via 34 Scores for Piano, Organ, Harpsichord and Celeste.

Don’t Apologize for Classical Music’s Complexity – That’s its Strength

The Guardian: Alan Davey
Naysayers argue classical music is being chased to extinction by technology. But young audiences in search of authentic experiences are embracing it more than ever before, says Alan Davey, controller of Radio 3

Nina Simone: Her Art and Life in 33 Songs

Pitchfork: Daphne A. Brooks
In conversations with artists including Chan Marshall, Maxwell, and Esperanza Spalding, and through examination of her most iconic songs, we look at the life of a true spellbinder.

“Sgt. Pepper’s” at 50: Was it a Concept Album or an Identity Crisis?

Salon: Annie Zaleski
Beatles fans, get your credit cards ready: On May 26, the Fab Four is unleashing a lavish revamp of 1967’s “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” in honor of the landmark album’s 50th anniversary.

Why Deregulation Destroys Spotify, Pandora & the Music Industry Comeback

Digital Music News: Paul Resnikoff
Publishers think they’re getting a raw deal in America.  And they’re probably right.  But you can’t deregulate without destroying some of the biggest music streaming services in the world.

The Arts Brand

Barry’s Blog
Over the past decade we’ve talked a lot about branding and our brands.  It’s a somewhat confusing topic, and we are often unsure what we mean by the term.  Beyond our organizations, the arts as a whole also have a brand, and this is what interests me.

 

LOOKING FOR MORE ON THE WEEK’S NEWS?  Visit the Digest Online here >

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Entrepreneurs of the Month – Jacobs School Audio Engineers!

Jacobs School Audio Engineers are Impressive Entrepreneurs

We’re pleased to introduce the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music 2017 graduates of the Audio Engineering and Sound Production program as our May Entrepreneurs of the Month!

These talented young professionals are fully engaged at the leading edge of technology, music, and culture. With the intensity and rigor of their IU studies behind them, their multiple talents position them well to drive innovation in an ever-evolving industry.

We’re excited to see where their skills and talents take them, and the industry, next.

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The OECD is Hiring Great Music Students for PROJECT JUMPSTART!

The OECD is Hiring Great Music Students for PROJECT JUMPSTART!

The Jacobs School of Music’s Office of Entrepreneurship & Career Development (OECD), is planning to appoint FOUR motivated Jacobs School students with great communication and organizational skills to its Project Jumpstart team for the academic year.

•    New This Year! The team will be made up of four paid interns, each with a specific portfolio. See below for more info!
•    Please Note: Deadline for Application is 5pm, Friday, May 19, 2017.

Click here for details >>

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MUSIC, BUSINESS, PEACE Summit | May 12

You’re invited to join us!

A day that brings together national and international researchers, activists, and artists who currently focus on two major fields of interest – “Music and Peace” and “Business and Peace” – in a series of presentations and discussions.

Friday, May 12, 2017| William and Gayle Cook Library, M285
Indiana University Jacobs School of Music

#musicbusinesspeace


As the first summit of its kind, the project will actively juxtapose and cross-pollinate a wide range of intellectual and artistic practices in the belief that a coherent set of understandings can emerge on how the two disciplines interact with and co-inhabit their worlds. The day is a discovery of ideas that will lead to a larger conference in May 2018.

> Sign Up Here if you plan to attend (either in-person or online)


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS | Friday, May 12, 2017

Invited participants come from a broad cross-section, including those whose careers are centered on global studies, peace and peace building. Local, national, and international entities are represented.

  • 9:00am – Tim Fort: Opening Remarks
  • 9:15am – Olivier Urbain – “Business and Music in Peacebuilding: Parallels and Paradoxes”
  • 9:45am – Scott Shackelford: “Cyber-Peace”

Break

  • 10:30 – Carolyn Calloway-Thomas: “Empathy”
  • 11:00 – Kathleen Higgins: “Connecting Music to Ethics”
  • 10:30am – Alexander Bernstein with Connie Cook Glen: “Leonard Bernstein’s Legacy: Moving Forward”
  • 12:00pm – Ruth Stone and Alain Barker: Summing Up

Lunch

  • 2:00pm – Connie Cook Glen: Conversations with Each Other
  • 2:10pm – Andre De Quadros with Aida Huseynova: “The Awkward and Troubled Business of Music and Peace”
  • 2:45pm – Cindy Schipani: “Recording Artists, Music, Social Change, and the Business World”

Break

  • 3:30pm – Nancy Love: “From Settler Colonialism to Standing Rock: Hearing Native Voices for Peace”
  • 4:00pm – Jerry White with Tim Fort: “Reflections on Quantifying the Hard to Quantify”
  • 4:30pm – Connie Cook Glen and Alain Barker: Concluding Discussion

Summit Planning Team: Alain Barker, Timothy Fort, Constance Cook Glen, Aida Huseynova, Scott Shackelford, Ruth Stone.

Any Questions? Please send thoughts and any questions to Connie Cook Glen: cglen@indiana.edu.


An event hosted and/or sponsored by the IU Jacobs School of Music and the IU Kelley School of Business.

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Weekly Digest, with a focus on Bang On A Can

BANG ON A CAN
Still Seething with Energy

NY Times: Corrinna da Fonseca-Wollheim
When the composers’ collective Bang on a Can alighted on the scene 30 years ago, one of its defining qualities was volume. Amplified to exuberant rock-music levels, works by its founding members, David Lang, Julia Wolfe and Michael Gordon, typically featured a novel mix of electric guitars and traditional orchestral instruments. Read about how things have (and have not) changed for one of the country’s leading new music projects.

Read more on the latest in music news and opinion via the full edition >>

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A Conversation with Jazz Bassist John Clayton

Project Jumpstart recently sat down with jazz bassist and IU alumnus John Clayton to discuss his time at IU, his career and how its many facets have changed over time, and his advice to musicians in today’s musical climate. The artist is a natural born multitasker.
As a composer, arranger, conductor, producer, educator, and yes, extraordinary bassist, he constantly pursues a number of challenging assignments and commissions. With a Grammy on his shelf and eight additional nominations, artists such as Diana Krall, Paul McCartney, Regina Carter, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Gladys Knight, Queen Latifah, and Charles Aznavour vie for a spot on his crowded calendar.
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Where do your NEA dollars really go? What we learned on an Indiana road trip.

(from the IAC – Indiana Arts Commission)

Early this month, a writer and photographer from the Washington Post, paid a visit to Indiana. Their assignment? To see first hand the impact of public funding of the arts, particularly funding from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

After nearly a week touring nearly every corner of the state, the journalists found Hoosiers not only making art, but changing lives –  sometimes their own – through publicly funded art programs.

Read the feature story here.
(source: The Washington Post)

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Indiana’s Creative Economy revealed

SELF-EMPLOYED CREATIVE OCCUPATIONS DRIVE INDIANA’S CREATIVE ECONOMY
The Indiana Arts Commission (IAC) announced the release of the complete, first statewide research review of Indiana’s Creative Economy and Employment Impact. One month after the release of the study’s executive summary, the detailed report breaks down the statewide research to match the 11 IAC service regions.

Read the press release here >

Read up on the latest news and opinion in the music world by connecting to the Weekly Digest >

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Mary Grogan – Entrepreneur of the Month!

MARY GROGAN: Soprano, Clinician, & General Director of OperaMaya

This month, Project Jumpstart interviews Jacobs alumna, Mary Grogan. Soprano Mary Grogan is a passionate advocate for the arts, the founder and general director of the OperaMaya Foundation, a sought after vocal clinician, speaker, teacher, and performer.

She is best known for her work with the government and private sector of México to promote and enrich the musical culture throughout the Yucatán Peninsula while developing sustainable cultural tourism strategies. Ms. Grogan’s
international portfolio career makes her a pioneer in the field of musical entrepreneurship and the growing musical marketplace of Latin America. She divides her time between the Yucatán Peninsula of México and the United States.

Read the full interview here >

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The Democracy of American Music

Anne Midgette, classical music writer for the Washington Post, considers the SHIFT Festival that focuses on American orchestras. She asks “What is American music” And, perhaps more to the point, why do we care so much?”
See the Article here

Read more news in the Weekly Digest here!
– an update on arts funding in the US, the latest research and opinion in the world of music, national and international news, entrepreneurship activity, …

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