Berlin Summer University of the Arts 2015

Introducing the Berlin Summer University of the Arts 2015 at the Berlin University of the Arts (UdK).

Berlin-summerA wide spectrum of courses in Music, Fine Arts, Design/Service Design and the Performing Arts as well as interdisciplinary workshops is supplemented by seminars in Creative Entrepreneurship, Self-Marketing and Arts Management. All current information about the courses (deadlines, fees, accommodation) as well as online registration is available on our website: www.summer-university.udk-berlin.de

We would also like to make you aware of our very special writing workshop, a “Writing Ashram” with Ingrid Scherübl and Katja Günther, conceived especially for PhD students looking to make significant progress on their dissertations.

If you would like more information or course material, or have any further questions about our programme please feel free to contact us at any time at: summer-courses@udk-berlin.de.

Warm regards and thanks,
The Berlin Summer University of the Arts Team
___________________________

Berlin Summer University of the Arts
Universität der Künste Berlin
Berlin Career College
International Summer School of Creative Entrepreneurship/ISSCE

www.summer-university.udk-berlin.de

tel. 030-31852087
fax. 030-31852690

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IU Wind Ensemble to perform at national college wind band convention

The Indiana University Wind Ensemble will perform at the College Band Directors National Association national conference in Nashville, Tenn., this Thursday evening, March 26. The performance will take place at 7:30 p.m. in Schermerhorn Symphony Center, the home of the Nashville Symphony Orchestra.

Stephen Pratt

Stephen Pratt

The IU Wind Ensemble is conducted by Stephen Pratt, Jacobs School of Music professor, and will feature Jacobs professor Jeff Nelsen as guest soloist performing The Glass Bead Game by James Beckel.

Nelsen is best known as the hornist of the Canadian Brass, with which he toured and recorded for eight years. As professor of horn at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, Nelsen teaches horn and chamber music. As a horn soloist, he has performed concerti with orchestra and given recitals on five continents. He has performed with dozens of orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic, Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Houston and National symphonies, Philadelphia and Minnesota orchestras, and the Canadian and New York City Opera companies. He has held full-time positions in the Montreal, Vancouver and Winnipeg symphony orchestras.

The IU Wind Ensemble was selected, along with several other groups from across the nation, to perform at the national convention after a rigorous screening by a distinguished panel of musicians.

The concert will include music by two members of the Jacobs School composition faculty: Ra! by David Dzubay to open the concert and Jug Blues and Fat Pickin’ by Don Freund to bring the concert to a virtuosic conclusion. A brand new work by internationally known conductor and composer André Previn, Music for Wind Orchestra – No Strings Attached, will also be featured. The ensemble will also present the second performance of Rite of Passage arranged by Cliff Colnot. Colnot is a frequent guest conductor at the Jacobs School of Music and arranged the work for a performance by members of his Chicago Civic Orchestra, which premiered the work.

The IU Wind Ensemble holds a distinguished reputation for musical leadership in the wind band field. Recognized as one of the finest collegiate wind ensembles in the world, the ensemble is composed of some of the most advanced music majors from all areas of the Jacobs School of Music. The group performs a wide variety of the finest wind literature, including classics of the repertoire, chamber music for winds and contemporary works.

The ensemble has performed previously at all of the most important wind band national venues, including, in the last seven years, conventions held by the College Band Directors National Association, American Bandmasters Association and Music Educators National Conference.

Pratt teaches graduate wind conducting courses and is the chair of the Department of Bands/Wind Conducting at the Jacobs School. In demand as a guest conductor, clinician and adjudicator of wind bands and orchestras across the country, he is recipient of the Distinguished Service to Music medal awarded by Kappa Kappa Psi, the national collegiate band honorary organization. He has also been honored with the Outstanding Bandmaster award, Gamma chapter (Indiana) of Phi Beta Mu (1998), the Outstanding University Music Educator award, Indiana Music Educators Association (2001) and the Calvert Outstanding Music Educator Award (2014).

Pratt is a past president of the College Band Directors National Association North Central Division and past president of the Indiana Bandmasters Association. He is an elected member of the American Bandmasters Association as well as a former member of the executive board of the National Band Association and has been a member of the Jacobs School of Music faculty since 1984.

ERIC STARK – March Entrepreneur of the Month

EntrepreneurHeader-StarkMeet ERIC STARK, Project Jumpstart’s Entrepreneur of the Month!
Eric is Artistic Director of the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir
and Director of Choral Activities at Butler University

Stark-150By developing a professional life that combines performance, scholarship and collaborative leadership, Jacobs School alumnus and conductor Dr. Eric Stark has established himself as a leading choral-orchestral specialist. He is currently director of choral activities at Butler University and artistic director of the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir.

Project Jumpstart recently caught up with him to discuss trends in choral music, seek advice on how best to prepare for a career in music, and to see how he maintains his very busy schedule.

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE >

IU Wind Ensemble to perform at national college wind band convention

The Indiana University Wind Ensemble will perform at the College Band Directors National Association national conference in Nashville, Tenn., this Thursday evening, March 26. The performance will take place at 7:30 p.m. in Schermerhorn Symphony Center, the home of the Nashville Symphony Orchestra.

Stephen Pratt

Stephen Pratt

The IU Wind Ensemble is conducted by Stephen Pratt, Jacobs School of Music professor, and will feature Jacobs professor Jeff Nelsen as guest soloist performing The Glass Bead Game by James Beckel.

Nelsen is best known as the hornist of the Canadian Brass, with which he toured and recorded for eight years. As professor of horn at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, Nelsen teaches horn and chamber music. As a horn soloist, he has performed concerti with orchestra and given recitals on five continents. He has performed with dozens of orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic, Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Houston and National symphonies, Philadelphia and Minnesota orchestras, and the Canadian and New York City Opera companies. He has held full-time positions in the Montreal, Vancouver and Winnipeg symphony orchestras.

The IU Wind Ensemble was selected, along with several other groups from across the nation, to perform at the national convention after a rigorous screening by a distinguished panel of musicians.

The concert will include music by two members of the Jacobs School composition faculty: Ra! by David Dzubay to open the concert and Jug Blues and Fat Pickin’ by Don Freund to bring the concert to a virtuosic conclusion. A brand new work by internationally known conductor and composer André Previn, Music for Wind Orchestra – No Strings Attached, will also be featured. The ensemble will also present the second performance of Rite of Passage arranged by Cliff Colnot. Colnot is a frequent guest conductor at the Jacobs School of Music and arranged the work for a performance by members of his Chicago Civic Orchestra, which premiered the work.

The IU Wind Ensemble holds a distinguished reputation for musical leadership in the wind band field. Recognized as one of the finest collegiate wind ensembles in the world, the ensemble is composed of some of the most advanced music majors from all areas of the Jacobs School of Music. The group performs a wide variety of the finest wind literature, including classics of the repertoire, chamber music for winds and contemporary works.

The ensemble has performed previously at all of the most important wind band national venues, including, in the last seven years, conventions held by the College Band Directors National Association, American Bandmasters Association and Music Educators National Conference.

Pratt teaches graduate wind conducting courses and is the chair of the Department of Bands/Wind Conducting at the Jacobs School. In demand as a guest conductor, clinician and adjudicator of wind bands and orchestras across the country, he is recipient of the Distinguished Service to Music medal awarded by Kappa Kappa Psi, the national collegiate band honorary organization. He has also been honored with the Outstanding Bandmaster award, Gamma chapter (Indiana) of Phi Beta Mu (1998), the Outstanding University Music Educator award, Indiana Music Educators Association (2001) and the Calvert Outstanding Music Educator Award (2014).

Pratt is a past president of the College Band Directors National Association North Central Division and past president of the Indiana Bandmasters Association. He is an elected member of the American Bandmasters Association as well as a former member of the executive board of the National Band Association and has been a member of the Jacobs School of Music faculty since 1984.

DownBeat: Jazz Educator Steve Zegree Dies at 61

DownBeat Magazine
3/11/2015

Zegree_Steve.headshot.168Steve Zegree, an internationally respected vocal jazz educator who was also an accomplished pianist and choral conductor, died March 7 in Bloomington, Indiana. He was 61 and had been suffering from pancreatic cancer.

Since August 2012, Zegree had served as the Pam and Jack Burks Professor of Music at Indiana University’s Jacobs School of Music, where he directed the Singing Hoosiers and Vocal Jazz Ensemble I. Prior to that, he was a longtime faculty member at Western Michigan University, where he began his teaching career in 1978 and later was named the Bobby McFerrin Distinguished Professor of Music.

While at WMU, Zegree founded the acclaimed collegiate vocal ensemble Gold Company, which performed at festivals and conferences around the world and won close to 50 DownBeat Student Music Awards under his direction. He also toured and recorded regularly as a pianist with the Western Jazz Quartet, a faculty group.

Known as a dedicated mentor to generations of vocal jazz students, Zegree was held in high regard by his peers in the educational community. “It is with deep sadness but incredible gratitude that we say goodbye to our director, our friend, our motivator, our inspiration and our visionary voice, Dr. Stephen Zegree,” said Ly Wilder, a member of the vocal jazz faculty at the Jacobs School, in a statement issued by Indiana University. “As a student and a colleague, I have been blessed to know the generosity and the artistry of this man. He has invested his life in the musical growth and professional development of so many young musicians, and he leaves a legacy of beautiful music in his wake.”

Zegree, who was inducted into the DownBeat Jazz Education Hall of Fame in 2012, placed high expectations on his students, drawing from his own extensive experience as a professional performing musician. Although frequently described as “demanding,” he was known as a compassionate teacher with boundless energy and a disarming sense of humor. His success has been attributed to his tireless personality and an underlying commitment to excellence. “I work hard; I put in a lot of hours, and I have a lot of energy,” he said in the June 2012 issue of DownBeat. “If I average four or five hours [of sleep] a night, I’m feeling pretty good.”

Born on May 5, 1953, in Vancouver, Washington, Zegree started playing piano at age 3. He received a bachelor’s degree in piano performance from Miami University in 1975 and a master’s degree in piano performance from Indiana University in 1978. He would go on to receive a doctorate in choral conducting from the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 1989.

Zegree discovered his passion for teaching after beginning his career as a performer. When WMU hired him in 1978, he was charged with teaching piano and molding an existing ensemble called the Varsity Vagabonds into a respectable vocal jazz group. “Being a college professor wasn’t something that I had aspired to or was part of my life script,” he told DownBeat. “The opportunity came up and initially I thought, ‘I’ll try this out for a year.’”

His presence at WMU helped to boost the school’s international cachet as a place to study jazz. He started an annual vocal jazz festival at the school and founded the Steve Zegree Vocal Jazz Camp for high school and college students and teachers during his stint there.

A Steinway Artist, Zegree maintained an active schedule as a performer, clinician and choral conductor throughout his teaching career. He played piano with symphony orchestras, gave solo concerts and toured as a keyboardist with national Broadway shows.

Additionally, he was the arranger and rehearsal director for actor-singer-producer Nick Lachey’s winning choir on NBC’s telecast of Clash of the Choirs, and he conducted the World Youth Choir during the 2008 Olympics in China.

Zegree recorded four CDs as pianist with the Western Jazz Quartet, and one as a leader, Steve Zegree & Friends (Sea Breeze, 2009). He also produced several recordings, including the Grammy-nominated Mark Murphy Sings Nat’s Choice: The Complete Nat “King” Cole Songbook, Volumes 1 & 2 (Muse, 1994).

Along with teaching, performing and recording, Zegree was a published author and in-demand musical arranger. He wrote two definitive books on jazz singing and performance: The Complete Guide to Teaching Vocal Jazz (Heritage Music Press/Lorenz Music Publishing) and The Wow Factor: How To Create It, Inspire It & Achieve It (Hal Leonard). More than 100 of his arrangements have been published and are in use by choral groups around the world.

Zegree served on the selection committee for the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival from 1992 to 1998. He was appointed national co-chair of the International Association for Jazz Education Vocal Jazz Committee from 1990 to 1994, and he had affiliations with numerous professional organizations, including the American Choral Directors Association, College Music Society, International Federation for Choral Music and Jazz Education Network.

A statement released by Zegree’s family described his legacy as “the thousands of singers and musicians, both professional and amateur, who had the opportunity to study, learn and perform with this most extraordinary man of such exceptional talent and warmth.”

Two collegiate scholarship funds bear Zegree’s name: The Steve Zegree Vocal Jazz Scholarship Fund at IU and The Steve Zegree Vocal Jazz Endowed Scholarship at WMU.

Zegree is survived by his wife, Laurie Hofmann; his children, Sarah and Nat; and his sister, Joan Zegree.

Festival featuring New Music and Art from Australia

Prof. David Ward-Steinman with the assistance of Alumna Melody Eötvös (DM ’14) will be presenting a mini-Australian Music Festival at the Jacobs School
of Music on the 25th & 26th March 2015.  Guest Artists include pianist
Bernadette Harvey from Sydney, and Composer-Clarinetist-Visual Artist Dr. Brigid
Burke from Melbourne, Australia.

The main event, a chamber
music concert, will take place on the 25th March at 8pm in Auer Hall
highlighting Burke and Harvey, with additional performances by David
Ward-Steinman.  An IU student percussion quartet will also be presenting Nigel
Westlake’s Omphalo Centric Lecture.  The concert location will also feature
indigenous and modern Australian Art from the collection of David and Patrice
Ward-Steinman.

On Thursday afternoon, 26th March, at 4pm in Ford
Hall Brigid Burke will also present a lecture on performance processes through
the composition/improvisation of interactive works and exploring cross art forms
in live performance through a strategy of layering to represent complexity of
images we see and sounds we hear.

For more information and updates on these events visit https://australiannewmusicabroad.wordpress.com/upcoming-concert-new-music-and-art-from-australia/

Classical Orchestra and Concentus impress with dynamic Haydn

Bloomington Herald – MUSIC REVIEW

Chang’s performance was remarkable

By Peter Jacobi H-T Reviewer | pjacobi@heraldt.com | Posted: Monday, March 9, 2015 12:00 am

The Historical Performance Institute, formerly known as the Early Music Institute, brought great beauty to Auer Hall Friday evening with a program of music by Haydn.

In charge was Dana Marsh, an eminent scholar/conductor/organist/singer currently serving as visiting associate professor and coordinator at the institute. He had assembled the Indiana University Classical Orchestra, the ensemble Concentus and a brilliant fortepianist, Hsuan Chang, for an hour of Franz Joseph Haydn: his Piano Concerto Number 4 in G Major and the Mass in B-Flat Major (“Harmoniemesse”). The results of his assembling and preparing were delightful.

Chang, a doctoral candidate concentrating on mastery of both the fortepiano and the harpsichord, turned in a remarkable performance of the 1782 concerto, a lovely piece of music. Her limber and sensitive finger work on the gentler-than-piano instrument brought admirable flow and clarity to her interpretation. To that, she added a welcome warmth and elegance that the score appears to beg for. With the Marsh-led orchestra contributing complementary partnership, one heard a delicious collaboration, Haydn done in classic period style, the way the composer might have heard it or have wished to hear it.

The “Harmoniemesse” (“Wind-Band Mass”) was Haydn’s last major work, and he led its premiere at a church in Eisenstadt, back to where, earlier in his life, he had served the noble Esterhazy family. The music calls for a large contingent of wind instruments; thus, it acquires a majesty as a beefed up orchestra is joined by a chorus and four soloists who get to sing some sublime music, set to the standard text. Marsh led his forces with formidable energy and to strong impact, coaxing beauteous and stirring sound from the orchestral delegation, the 21-member chorus, and the fine soloists taken from within its ranks: soprano Madeline Stern, alto Amber McKoy, tenor Bille Bruley, and bass Jason Eck. Bravo to the whole of it.

Fortepianist, Hsuan Chang, offered a remarkable performance of Haydn Piano Concerto No. 4

Fortepianist, Hsuan Chang, offered a remarkable performance of Haydn Piano Concerto No. 4

Dana Marsh, Director
Dana Marsh, Director

 

Guest Alumni Career Session: Yacht Rock Revue

Yacht Rock Revue band and career alumni event header

Thursday, March 12 | 2:30-4pm | MA004

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Click on Events, then Workshops

The Yacht Rock Revue boasts five Jacobs School Alumni and will be returning to Bloomington to play the Bluebird as part of their Midwest tour. In their Project Jumpstart career session, they will talk about how their group evolved from an indie band in Atlanta to “the Greatest Show on Surf and the finest tribute to ‘70s light rock to ever perform anywhere. Ever.”

Famous for blurring the lines between tribute band, original act, and comedic troupe, the Yacht Rock Revue has packed shows at historic venues including the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta, the Knitting Factory in New York City, Athens’ famed Georgia Theatre, Washington DC’s State Theatre, and Nashville’s Mercy Lounge. Members have played shared the stage with such artists as Weezer, Billy Joel, Walter Egan, .38 Special, John Mayer, Zac Brown Band, Little River Band, Sheryl Crow, Noel Gallagher, Starbuck, Sarah McLachlan, Don Henley, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Neil Finn, Jellyfish, Devo, Nine Inch Nails, Joan Jett, Wet Willie, Bon Jovi, Skid Row, the Saturday Night Live Band, and many others.

See you there!

Team JumpStart

MUSIC REVIEW: ‘SOUTH PACIFIC’

Production’s 2 casts honor this musical favorite By Peter Jacobi   For decades, when the Jacobs School added two summer … Continue reading

Jazz great David Baker honored for lifelong commitment to music, teaching

By Marcela Creps

 

David Baker may not have planted the seed that resulted in the rich garden that is jazz in Bloomington today.

But he has been the longtime caretaker of that seed — watering, fertilizing and protecting the small shoot that grew to unimaginable proportions.

So it seems fitting that Saturday, Baker will receive the 2015 Living Legend Award during Bloomington’s Black History Month Gala.

David Baker in his office Wednesday at Merrill Hall. The longtime Bloomington musician will be honored at the 2015 Black History Month Gala at the Hilton Garden Inn Saturday.

David Baker in his office Wednesday at Merrill Hall. The longtime Bloomington musician will be honored at the 2015 Black History Month Gala at the Hilton Garden Inn Saturday.

Throughout his illustrious career, Baker, 83, could have left this small Midwestern town. And he was offered those chances, but he chose to stay.

“I can’t imagine being anyplace else,” he said.

Baker first came to Bloomington in 1949. He stayed through 1954, earning both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Indiana University. After graduation, he spent time trying to launch his career in Los Angeles and spent a year teaching in Missouri before returning to IU to pursue a doctorate.

By 1966, Baker joined the faculty of the music school at IU. Although he’d established himself as a talented musician, Baker also became known as a great teacher.

Throughout his career at IU, Baker was given the opportunity to expand the program. He wrote books and compositions. At IU, Baker received support from then-music school Dean Wilfred C. Bain and former university President Herman B Wells.

“It was a hotbed of activity,” Baker said.

Despite living in the Midwest, Baker still had opportunities to mingle with famous people. He held board positions. He served on the National Council of the Arts with actor Robert Stack, with whom he enjoyed talking about “The Untouchables.” During meetings, Baker would watch actress Celeste Holm.

“She would knit,” he said. “I didn’t say she paid attention.”

And he traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia and Japan and was conductor and musical and artistic director of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra.

“It was such a thrilling experience to be all over the world,” Baker said.

Baker’s office in Merrill Hall is full of his life’s memories. He looks fondly at the photos and posters and proudly points to a photo of him talking at a lectern with Bill and Hillary Clinton in the background. He also likes the framed document signed by President Ronald Reagan when he was appointed to the National Council on the Arts.

But some of the photos are a reminder of the passage of time. Baker looks at one photo and guesses about half of the people in it have passed away.

“Those things lie heavy on your heart,” Baker said.

He keeps in touch with high school friends and attends reunions when possible.

“I keep a list of all the people that were close to me that want to stay together,” Baker said.

He also keeps up with many in the jazz community and recently visited his old friend, Quincy Jones. A signed poster by Jones addresses Baker as “my brother from before electricity.”

Baker is able to hear the legacy he’s left. He still attends local jazz shows and enjoys seeing how young people, including kids in middle school, are learning to play jazz.

He’s loved teaching, and his classes at IU were always popular.

When he broke his hip a few years ago, he was teaching a class. Baker’s first words when he fell were to the teaching assistant to continue playing the recording. While the 100-plus students started dialing 911, Baker wanted the students to hear what was coming up next.

Hearing the next generation of performers makes Baker glad he doesn’t have to compete with the youngsters of today.

“That’s the bread and butter of where it’s all going,” he said.

Baker is still eager to teach and has advice for musicians trying to re-create jazz music that’s been done in more ways than can be counted.

“Find something that will set you apart from the people that are there,” he said. “Give me something that tells me that’s you.”

The growth of jazz in Bloomington, he points out, means that on any given night, you can hear jazz being played and enjoyed by people of all ages.

“It can only go one way. It can keep going up,” he said.

 

© Herald Times 2015