Jacobs School Graduate to Participate in Leonidas Kavakos International Violin Masterclass

Paul Hauer

Paul Hauer

Leonidas Kavakos

Leonidas Kavakos

Congratulations to Jacobs School graduate, Paul Hauer, who was selected to participate in the Leonidas Kavakos International Violin Masterclass & Chamber Music Workshop, which takes place this weekend, May 22-24, 2015, in Athens, Greece.

Hauer, a student of Alexander Kerr, is one of only seventeen violinists and the only American selected for the masterclass. A frequent participant in competitions, Hauer has received awards at the Hellam Young Artists Competition in 2014, the Indianapolis Matinee Musicale Collegiate Competition in 2013, and the Denver Young Artists Orchestra National Violin Concerto Competition in 2011. As a result of these awards he has had the opportunity to perform with numerous orchestras both in the U.S. and abroad and has also had the privilege of studying and working with many of today’s renowned conductors and violinists. Hauer completed his Bachelor of Music at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and his Master of Music at the Jacobs School in 2014.

This weekend’s masterclass & chamber music workshop was founded by Leonidas Kavakos, a Greek violinist and conductor who has himself won prizes at several international violin competitions – including the Sibelius, Paganini, and Indianapolis competitions. Thanks to an Onassis Foundation scholarship, he was able to come to Indiana University at the age of 19 to study with Josef Gingold, who instilled in him an absolute passion and love for violin, for music, and, last but not least, for sharing his teaching legacy.

Historical Performance Institute appearing at preeminent venues in May and June

HPI Smithsonian SymposiumThe Jacobs School of Music Historical Performance Institute will be well represented this weekend (May 8-10) at a symposium hosted by the Smithsonian Institute’s Chamber Music Society in Washington, D.C. Performers, scholars, journalists, and administrators nationwide will gather to focus and reflect on the past, present, and future of “Historically Informed Performance in American Higher Education.”

The Jacobs School will send its Renaissance wind band, Forgotten Clefs, to perform for the occasion. Counterpart student ensembles from Juilliard, Yale, Oberlin, Case Western Reserve, Peabody, and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music will also be performing. The student groups will be featured in two concerts, with Forgotten Clefs concluding the second performance.

Professor Dana Marsh, coordinator of the Historical Performance Institute (HPI), will contribute to a detailed panel discussion on the conference’s topical focus. Facilitating the conversation will be David Stull, president of San Francisco Conservatory. Joining Marsh on the panel will be Fred Bronstein, dean of Peabody Conservatory; Andrea Kalyn, dean of Oberlin Conservatory; Ross Duffin, director of Historical Performance at Case Western Reserve University, and Benjamin Sosland, administrative director of Juilliard Historical Performance.

“This is a valuable opportunity for all of us to assess collectively our position, as a discipline, within the field of music performance, pedagogy, and scholarship in American higher education,” said Marsh. “Not since IU hosted such an event at the behest of IU Early Music Institute founder Thomas Binkley some 20 years ago has there been a similar gathering of educators. As so much has changed since that time, it can only be an opportunity of highest value for all participants.”

In addition, the HPI will send its student ensemble comprised of sackbuts (early trombones), dulcians (early bassoons), shawms (Renaissance oboes), and percussion to the Boston Early Music Festival (BEMF), one of the world’s foremost exhibitions in the field of historical performance. Forgotten Clefs was one of four groups selected to perform at BEMF in the Young Performers Series, sponsored by Early Music America.

 

Brent te Velde Wins 2015 Rodland Scholarship Competition

Organist Brent te Velde is this year’s winner of the 2015 John R. Rodland Memorial Scholarship awarded under the auspices of the Northern New Jersey Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. The three finalists, selected by a recorded round, were required to perform a program of mixed repertoire. They were also asked to play a hymn, run a rehearsal, and interview with the judges. The competition aims to award organists with outstanding performance and liturgical skills. A DM organ student of Chris Young, Mr. te Velde received the $10,000.00 first prize following the competition April 19, 2015.

Ying Quartet Welcomes Robin Scott as First Violinist

April 15, 2015

More Information:
For Media Only: Helene Snihur (585-274-1057, hsnihur@esm.rochester.edu)

ROCHESTER, N.Y.–Robin Scott, an award-winning musician described as one of America’s rising stars on the classical music stage, is joining the Ying Quartet as the Grammy-winning ensemble’s first violinist.

As the quartet’s newest member, he is joining siblings and founding members David, cello; Janet, violin; and Phillip, viola. Scott also will receive an appointment to the faculty of the Eastman School of Music, where the ensemble is the string-quartet-in residence.

Scott has built a varied career as a soloist, chamber musician, and concertmaster. He has competed internationally, winning first prizes in the California International Young Artists Competition and the WAMSO Young Artist Competition in Minnesota, and second prizes in the Yehudi Menuhin International Violin Competition, the Irving M. Klein International String Competition, and the Stulberg International String Competition.

“Robin is both an insightful, creative musician and top-shelf violinist, and we are thrilled to begin the next chapter of our quartet’s life with him,” said David Ying. “From the first phrases we played together, the musical chemistry was alive and electric. It is easy to imagine a rewarding and stimulating musical future with Robin.”

Scott has appeared as a soloist with the Minnesota Orchestra, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Symphony, Fort Wayne Philharmonic, Montgomery Symphony, Orchestre National de Lille in France, and many others. He has given numerous recitals and performances throughout the United States and abroad, in such venues as Carnegie’s Weill Recital Hall and the Schubert Club in St. Paul, Minn.

As an avid and passionate chamber musician, Scott has performed at the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution, Boston’s Jordan Hall, the Morgan Library, Town Hall in New York City, and other venues. His festival appearances include the Marlboro Music Festival, Ravinia’s Steans Institute for Young Artists, Yellow Barn, Kneisel Hall, and the Saratoga and Chesapeake Chamber Music Festivals, MusicIC in Iowa City, and others. He has participated in the acclaimed Music From Marlboro tours, as well as tours under the auspices of the Ravinia Festival, and was a member of the Gesualdo String Quartet, the quartet-in-residence at the University of Notre Dame.

Scott, who will move to Rochester from Indianapolis, is also an accomplished and in-demand orchestral leader and has served as concertmaster of the New York Classical Players. He was guest concertmaster with the Fort Wayne Philharmonic and has performed with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra as guest principal second violin.

From 2011 to 2013, Scott was the Montgomery Symphony’s artist-in-residence. In that position, he was the concertmaster of the symphony, and also performed with the orchestra and throughout the community as a soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician.

A native of Indiana, Scott began studying the violin at age five and also took piano lessons. He received his Bachelor of Music Degree at the New England Conservatory and his Artist Diploma at Indiana University, where he was a student of Miriam Fried. He pursued additional studies at NEC with Donald Weilerstein, the founding first violinist of the Cleveland Quartet, and violist Kim Kashkashian. Previously, he was a student of Mimi Zweig at Indiana University’s preparatory program.

“I’m thrilled to be joining the Ying Quartet and to be coming to Rochester to teach at the Eastman School of Music,” said Scott. “The prospect of exploring the great quartet repertoire with wonderful colleagues is an honor. To pass on what we believe as musicians and instrumentalists is a great responsibility, and something which I look forward to with my students.”

The Ying Quartet receives praise around the world for its high-caliber and affecting performances in concerts and festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, Ravinia, Caramoor, and others. The ensemble teaches and performs each summer at the Bowdoin International Music Festival, for which David and Phillip Ying serve as artistic directors. The ensemble has worked on collaborative projects at Symphony Space in New York City and with musical partners such as pianist Menahem Pressler, cellist Paul Katz, and folk musician Mike Seeger, among others. Upcoming projects include a collaboration and recording with cellist Zuill Bailey, and piano quintet commission and recording with pianist and composer Billy Childs.

The Quartet’s album 4 + Four, recorded with the Turtle Island String Quartet, received a 2006 Grammy Award for best classical crossover album. In addition, The Ying Quartet received a Grammy nomination for best chamber music performances for its album Tchaikovsky: Three String Quartets, Souvenir de Florence. The Ying Quartet also has released Dim Sum, a recording of music by Chinese-American composers; American Anthem: The Music of Samuel Barber and Howard Hanson; and a recording of Anton Arensky’s String Quartets Nos. 1 and 2 and Piano Quintet.

Through its LifeMusic project, supported by the Institute for American music, the Ying Quartet has commissioned established and emerging composers to produce a distinctively American string quartet repertory. Their first recording of Life Music works, The Ying Quartet Play LifeMusic, was named Editor’s Choice by Gramophone magazine. Their second recording of commissions is titled The United States.

As students at the Eastman School of Music in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Yings studied with members of the Cleveland Quartet, the school’s quartet-in-residence. The Ying Quartet first came to national professional as the quartet-in-residence in Jesup, Iowa, under a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The quartet was awarded second prize in the 1992 Banff International String Competition and the following year won the Naumburg Chamber Music Award. They were appointed faculty quartet-in-residence at Eastman in 1997.

At Eastman, the Ying Quartet teaches in the string department and leads a rigorous chamber music program. An integral part of the chamber music curriculum is the Music for All program, in which students perform in community settings beyond the concert hall.

Scott will succeed violinist Ayano Ninomiya, who has served as first violinist of the quartet since 2010. “Ayano has been a wonderful colleague and close friend, and we are grateful that she has shared her amazing musical talents with us and our audiences these past years,” said David Ying. “We wish her the very best in her future performing and teaching endeavors, and look forward to our paths crossing often in the future.”

© Eastman School of Music 2015

Jumpstart Entrepreneur of the Month: NEW VOICES OPERA

Emergent. Relevant. Opera… written, performed, and produced by Jacobs School of Music students!

NVO-logo-1-150pxNew Voices Opera was founded in 2012 by Chappell Kingsland to produce his doctoral thesis project Intoxication: America’s Love Affair with Oil. Since then, the organization has grown into a full student-run company that premieres two operas each year and trains young professionals in all aspects of opera production, from composing and performing to designing, directing, and administrating.

Project Jumpstart sat down with NVO’s Executive Director Benjamin Smith, a current doctoral student in the Jacobs School’s voice department, to talk about the organization’s current work and its exciting plans for the future.

READ THE INTERVIEW HERE >


The Jacobs School Zorá and Azalea Quartets receive awards at 69th Annual Coleman Chamber Competition

Congratulations to two quartets from the Jacobs School, who were awarded two out of three prizes from the 69th Annual Coleman Chamber Ensemble Competition on Saturday, April 18, at the Pasadena Conservatory of Music in Pasadena, California.

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Azalea Quartet

The $7,500 Alice Coleman Prize was awarded to the Azalea Quartet, formed in 2013 by four devoted musicians pursuing their undergraduate degrees at the IU Jacobs School of Music. Members of the quartet, coached by Simin Ganatra of the Pacifica Quartet, include:

Jenna Barghouti, Violin
Joy Vucekovich, Violin
Ben Wagner, Viola
Graham Cullen, Cello

Zora

Zorá String Quartet

The $4,000 Coleman-Barstow Prize for Strings was awarded to the Zorá String Quartet, formed in 2012 by four Jacobs School students. The quartet is coached by Sibbi Bernhardsson of the Pacifica Quartet and includes members:

Dechopol Kowintaweewat, violin
Pablo Muñoz Salido, Viola
Seula Lee, Violin
Zizai Ning, Cello

This is the second year in a row that quartet’s from the Jacobs School have taken two of the three prizes at the Coleman Chamber Competition. In April 2014 the Wasmuth String Quartet was awarded the Alice Coleman Prize and the Kenari Quartet was awarded the Coleman-Saunderson Prize for Woodwinds or Brass.

Ying Quartet Welcomes Robin Scott as First Violinist

ROCHESTER, N.Y.–Robin Scott, an award-winning musician described as one of America’s rising stars on the classical music stage, is joining the Ying Quartet as the Grammy-winning ensemble’s first violinist.

As the quartet’s newest member, he is joining siblings and founding members David, cello; Janet, violin; and Phillip, viola. Scott also will receive an appointment to the faculty of the Eastman School of Music, where the ensemble is the string-quartet-in residence.

Scott has built a varied career as a soloist, chamber musician, and concertmaster. He has competed internationally, winning first prizes in the California International Young Artists Competition and the WAMSO Young Artist Competition in Minnesota, and second prizes in the Yehudi Menuhin International Violin Competition, the Irving M. Klein International String Competition, and the Stulberg International String Competition.

“Robin is both an insightful, creative musician and top-shelf violinist, and we are thrilled to begin the next chapter of our quartet’s life with him,” said David Ying. “From the first phrases we played together, the musical chemistry was alive and electric. It is easy to imagine a rewarding and stimulating musical future with Robin.”

Scott has appeared as a soloist with the Minnesota Orchestra, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Symphony, Fort Wayne Philharmonic, Montgomery Symphony, Orchestre National de Lille in France, and many others. He has given numerous recitals and performances throughout the United States and abroad, in such venues as Carnegie’s Weill Recital Hall and the Schubert Club in St. Paul, Minn.

As an avid and passionate chamber musician, Scott has performed at the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution, Boston’s Jordan Hall, the Morgan Library, Town Hall in New York City, and other venues. His festival appearances include the Marlboro Music Festival, Ravinia’s Steans Institute for Young Artists, Yellow Barn, Kneisel Hall, and the Saratoga and Chesapeake Chamber Music Festivals, MusicIC in Iowa City, and others. He has participated in the acclaimed Music From Marlboro tours, as well as tours under the auspices of the Ravinia Festival, and was a member of the Gesualdo String Quartet, the quartet-in-residence at the University of Notre Dame.

Scott, who will move to Rochester from Indianapolis, is also an accomplished and in-demand orchestral leader and has served as concertmaster of the New York Classical Players. He was guest concertmaster with the Fort Wayne Philharmonic and has performed with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra as guest principal second violin.

From 2011 to 2013, Scott was the Montgomery Symphony’s artist-in-residence. In that position, he was the concertmaster of the symphony, and also performed with the orchestra and throughout the community as a soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician.

A native of Indiana, Scott began studying the violin at age five and also took piano lessons. He received his Bachelor of Music Degree at the New England Conservatory and his Artist Diploma at Indiana University, where he was a student of Miriam Fried. He pursued additional studies at NEC with Donald Weilerstein, the founding first violinist of the Cleveland Quartet, and violist Kim Kashkashian. Previously, he was a student of Mimi Zweig at Indiana University’s preparatory program.

“I’m thrilled to be joining the Ying Quartet and to be coming to Rochester to teach at the Eastman School of Music,” said Scott. “The prospect of exploring the great quartet repertoire with wonderful colleagues is an honor. To pass on what we believe as musicians and instrumentalists is a great responsibility, and something which I look forward to with my students.”

The Ying Quartet receives praise around the world for its high-caliber and affecting performances in concerts and festivals including Aspen, Tanglewood, Ravinia, Caramoor, and others. The ensemble teaches and performs each summer at the Bowdoin International Music Festival, for which David and Phillip Ying serve as artistic directors. The ensemble has worked on collaborative projects at Symphony Space in New York City and with musical partners such as pianist Menahem Pressler, cellist Paul Katz, and folk musician Mike Seeger, among others. Upcoming projects include a collaboration and recording with cellist Zuill Bailey, and piano quintet commission and recording with pianist and composer Billy Childs.

The Quartet’s album 4 + Four, recorded with the Turtle Island String Quartet, received a 2006 Grammy Award for best classical crossover album. In addition, The Ying Quartet received a Grammy nomination for best chamber music performances for its album Tchaikovsky: Three String Quartets, Souvenir de Florence. The Ying Quartet also has released Dim Sum, a recording of music by Chinese-American composers; American Anthem: The Music of Samuel Barber and Howard Hanson; and a recording of Anton Arensky’s String Quartets Nos. 1 and 2 and Piano Quintet.

Through its LifeMusic project, supported by the Institute for American music, the Ying Quartet has commissioned established and emerging composers to produce a distinctively American string quartet repertory. Their first recording of Life Music works, The Ying Quartet Play LifeMusic, was named Editor’s Choice by Gramophone magazine. Their second recording of commissions is titled The United States.

As students at the Eastman School of Music in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Yings studied with members of the Cleveland Quartet, the school’s quartet-in-residence. The Ying Quartet first came to national professional as the quartet-in-residence in Jesup, Iowa, under a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The quartet was awarded second prize in the 1992 Banff International String Competition and the following year won the Naumburg Chamber Music Award. They were appointed faculty quartet-in-residence at Eastman in 1997.

At Eastman, the Ying Quartet teaches in the string department and leads a rigorous chamber music program. An integral part of the chamber music curriculum is the Music for All program, in which students perform in community settings beyond the concert hall.

Scott will succeed violinist Ayano Ninomiya, who has served as first violinist of the quartet since 2010. “Ayano has been a wonderful colleague and close friend, and we are grateful that she has shared her amazing musical talents with us and our audiences these past years,” said David Ying. “We wish her the very best in her future performing and teaching endeavors, and look forward to our paths crossing often in the future.”

Major Premieres for DiOrio: Lincoln Center, eighth blackbird, and more

April is a busy time for choral conducting faculty member Dominick DiOrio: in a
span of two weeks, he has four world premieres of new works for chorus.

Included in that list are a Lincoln Center / Alice Tully Hall
premiere on Friday April 17th with the Ithaca College Choir (“We Dance!”), and a
new work for the University of Richmond Schola Cantorum and Grammy-winning
chamber ensemble eighth blackbird on April 19th, with DiOrio conducting (“An
Equal Humanity”). Other premieres include Macalester College Concert Choir on
April 11th (“You Do Not Walk Alone”) and NOTUS on April 24th (“Stravinsky
Refracted”).

More information about these premieres and other
performances are on DiOrio’s website.

http://www.dominickdiorio.com/

 

Neil Hicks, IU JSOM Music Education student recognized with national award

Neil Hicks has been recognized by the National Association for Music Education
for his commitment and dedication to music education and has been awarded a
Professional Achievement Award. He has distinguished himself through his service
as an officer for the IU chapter of NAfME over the past several years and has
been instrumental in the success of the organization.

Neil Hicks is a senior from Chesterton, Indiana majoring in music education at the Indiana University (IU) Jacobs School of Music. Interested in all aspects of teaching
instrumental music, Neil is pursuing a dual degree in both band and orchestra
education, as well as minors in conducting and jazz studies. His principal
saxophone teachers at IU have been Otis Murphy and Thomas Walsh, and he has
played with the IU Concert and Symphonic Bands, the Jeremy Allen Big Band, the
Steve Allee Big Band, and the Marching Hundred. Neil has also served as the
president of IU’s collegiate chapter of the National Association for Music
Education and is an active member of the National Band Association. He is
currently student teaching at North Central High School near Indianapolis, where
he works with each of the four concert bands and two jazz bands in the program.
In his free time, Neil enjoys cooking and reading.

Lecture this evening: “Music and the Atypical Learner: Strategies for Success”

ChrisChristine Barton, Board-certified Music Therapist and founder/director of Central Canal Creative Arts Therapies (Indianapolis), will present a guest lecture on “Music and the Atypical Learner: Strategies for Success” this evening (Thursday, April 16) at 6:30pm in room M 350 of the Simon Bldg.

Ms. Barton will give a brief overview of the learning disorders most frequently encountered in the music studio and classroom (Asperger’s, autism spectrum disorder,  attention deficit hyperactivity and dyslexia) and the personality and behavioral traits that characterize each.   She will discuss the challenges these conditions present to the music teacher, and will outline practical strategies for effectively teaching the various types of atypical learner.   Following the lecture there will be a Q/A session, in which teachers can ask advice on how best to deal with the issues of particular atypical learners they are working with.

This presentation, co-sponsored by Piano Pedagogy Studies and Music Education, is free and open to all Jacobs School students.  Interested music teachers from area schools and communities are also welcome.   For more info. about Christine Barton, see:  http://www.christinebarton.net/practice.html