Music theorists active at SMT conference

Many students, faculty, and alumni of the music theory department participated in the annual meeting of the Society for Music Theory in Charlotte, North Carolina on October 31-November 3, 2013.

Among those presenting at the conference were Professors Kyle Adams, Eric Isaacson, Blair Johnston, and Daphne Tan; current PhD students Devin Chaloux, John Reef, and Paul Sherrill; and recent alumni Daniel Arthurs, Timothy Chenette, Garrett Michaelsen, and Mitch Ohriner.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Renaissance scholar Peter Schubert to visit, offer lectures as part of Five Friends Master Class Series

Schubert-1-300The Jacobs School of Music Theory Department will host a series of academic activities and two public talks April 3-4, with music theorist Peter Schubert, professor of music at McGill University.

Schubert’s visit is part of the Five Friends Master Class Series and the Robert Samels Visiting Scholar series.

“The offering of the Five Friends Master Classes Series for Jacobs School of Music Students makes me so happy,” said Clayton Samels, father of Robert Samels. “I know that Robert would be happy, too. What a great way to honor these friends. What a wonderful opportunity for Jacobs School of Music students.”

Public lectures offered during his visit are as follows:

Wednesday, April 3 at 3:30 p.m. in M267 (Music Library)
Presentation during the Music Theory Colloquium,
“Structural Functions of Counterpoint”

Thursday, April 4 at 5:00 p.m. in Sweeney Hall
Public Lecture, “Performing Renaissance Choral Music: Ethereal Purity or Sweaty Expression?”

Schubert will also work with students in the Early Music Institute by joining the Concentus ensemble in rehearsal.

About Peter Schubert

Peter Schubert studied theory and conducting with Nadia Boulanger in Paris and holds a Ph.D. in musicology from Columbia University, where he conducted the Barnard-Columbia Chorus, Opera Uptown, and the New Calliope Singers. A professor of music theory at McGill University since 1990, Schubert has published two textbooks on counterpoint and numerous articles on Renaissance music. In Montreal he founded VivaVoce, which has released four CDs of Renaissance, Romantic, and modern music. He has been invited to give lectures and workshops in the United States, Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, Switzerland and the Netherlands. Schubert has a series of videos demonstrating the art of Renaissance improvisation, which can be viewed on his YouTube channel, peterschubertmusic

Robert Samels

Robert Samels

Robert Samels

Robert Samels taught as an AI in the Jacobs School of Music Department of Music Theory. He was in charge of T231 (a sophomore aural skills course) and was loved and admired by his students. As a bass-baritone Samels appeared as Mr. Gibbs in the world-premiere of Our Town by Ned Rorem, as Marco in the collegiate premiere of William Bolcom’s A View from the Bridge, as well as Joseph and Herod in the collegiate premiere of El Niño by John Adams. In the spring of 2005, he was selected as a semi-finalist in the annual competition of the Oratorio Society of New York and, in September of that year, he conducted the premiere of his own opera Pilatvs. Samels began his vocal studies with Alfred Anderson at the University of Akron and Andreas Poulimenos at Bowling Green State University. He was a doctoral student in choral conducting at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music and studied voice with Giorgio Tozzi and Costanza Cuccaro.

 

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Michael McClimon wins award at MTSMA

bioPic-230Michael McClimon, PhD student in music theory, was named the winner of the Dorothy Payne Award for the best paper presented by a student at the eleventh annual meeting of the Music Theory Society of the Mid-Atlantic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 15-16, 2013. Michael’s paper was titled “Jazz Harmony, Transformations, and ii-V Space.”

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

The Jacobs School welcomes music theorist Janet Schmalfeldt for residency

newpicThe Jacobs School of Music Theory Department will host a series of academic activities and two public talks with music theorist Janet Schmalfeldt, professor of music at Tufts University, March 20-22.

Schmalfeldt’s visit is part of the Five Friends Master Class Series and the Robert Samels Visiting Scholar series.

“The offering of the Five Friends Master Classes Series for Jacobs School of Music Students makes me so happy,” said Clayton Samels, father of Robert Samels. “I know that Robert would be happy, too. What a great way to honor these friends. What a wonderful opportunity for Jacobs School of Music students.”

Public lectures offered during her visit are as follows:

Wednesday, March 20, Ford-Crawford Hall, 3:30 p.m.:
“Brahms, Again the ‘Master of Allusion,’ with his Godson in Mind”
This lecture will include performances by Jacobs student Jessica Beebe, soprano

Friday, March 22, Sweeney Hall, 4:30 p.m.:
“On Becoming a Performer of Schumann’s Die Davidsbündlertänze

“Janet Schmalfeldt’s broad musical and scholarly interests, complemented by her talents as a performer, make her a natural fit with the ideals of the Robert Samels Visiting Scholar Program and the Five Friends Series,” said Julian Hook, chair of the Department of Music Theory. “Her presence on campus for a few days will be a treat for the Jacobs School of Music and the music theory department.”

Janet Schmalfeldt holds a Master of Musical Arts degree in piano from the Yale School of Music and a Ph.D. in music theory from Yale University. She has taught at McGill University and at Yale, where she was awarded the Clauss Prize for Excellency in Teaching in 1993; she joined the Music Department at Tufts University in 1995.

She is the author of a book on Alban Berg’s opera Wozzeck and has published widely on late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century music; her most recent publication is a book entitled In the Process of Becoming: Analytic and Philosophical Perspectives on Form in Early Nineteenth-Century Music (Oxford University Press, 2011).

During the years 1993-95, she served as President of the New England Conference of Music Theorists; in November of 1999, she completed a two-year term as President of the Society for Music Theory. She has held seminars on musical form, performance, and analysis in Brazil, Italy, and the Netherlands and has given invited papers in Utrecht, Ghent, Tallinn, Freiburg, Warsaw, and Maynooth.

Her performances as pianist have included chamber, concerto, and solo music.

Robert Samels

Robert Samels

Robert Samels taught as an AI in the Jacobs School of Music Department of Music Theory. He was in charge of T231 (a sophomore aural skills course) and was loved and admired by his students. As a bass-baritone Samels appeared as Mr. Gibbs in the world-premiere of Our Town by Ned Rorem, as Marco in the collegiate premiere of William Bolcom’s A View from the Bridge, as well as Joseph and Herod in the collegiate premiere of El Niño by John Adams. In the spring of 2005, he was selected as a semi-finalist in the annual competition of the Oratorio Society of New York and, in September of that year, he conducted the premiere of his own opera Pilatvs. Samels began his vocal studies with Alfred Anderson at the University of Akron and Andreas Poulimenos at Bowling Green State University. He was a doctoral student in choral conducting at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music and studied voice with Giorgio Tozzi and Costanza Cuccaro.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Music Theory Department welcomes Joseph Straus for mini residency, two public lectures

Joseph Straus

As part of the Five Friends Master Class Series and the Robert Samels Visiting Scholar Program, the Music Theory Department will host a series of two public lectures by Joseph Straus, Distinguished Professor of Music at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. In addition, Straus’ visit will include guest-lecturing in a number of academic classes at the IU Jacobs School of Music between December 3 and 5.

Straus’ first public lecture is titled “Introduction to Disability Studies in Music” and will take place on Monday, Dec. 3 at 7:00 p.m. in Sweeney Hall. A second event, during the department’s weekly colloquium on Wednesday, Dec. 5 (3:30-5:00 p.m. in M267 in the Cook Music Library) will feature Straus’ lecture on “Stravinsky’s Aesthetics of Disability.”

Joseph Straus is the author of numerous books and articles on topics in twentieth-century music, including Twelve-Tone Music in America (2009), Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory (3rd ed., 2005), Stravinsky’s Late Music (2001), The Music of Ruth Crawford Seeger (1995), and Remaking the Past: Musical Modernism and the Influence of the Tonal Tradition (1990). His most recent publications, including Extraordinary Measures: Disability in Music (Oxford University Press, 2011), are among the first to bring to music the insights of Disability Studies. He is a former President of the Society for Music Theory.

Robert Samels

Robert Samels taught as an AI in the Jacobs School of Music Department of Music Theory. He was in charge of T231 (a sophomore aural skills course) and was loved and admired by his students. As a bass-baritone Samels appeared as Mr. Gibbs in the world-premiere of Our Town by Ned Rorem, as Marco in the collegiate premiere of William Bolcom’s A View from the Bridge, as well as Joseph and Herod in the collegiate premiere of El Niño by John Adams. In the spring of 2005, he was selected as a semi-finalist in the annual competition of the Oratorio Society of New York and, in September of that year, he conducted the premiere of his own opera Pilatvs. Samels began his vocal studies with Alfred Anderson at the University of Akron and Andreas Poulimenos at Bowling Green State University. He was a doctoral student in choral conducting at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music and studied voice with Giorgio Tozzi and Costanza Cuccaro.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Faculty and students participate extensively in combined American Musicological Society, Society for Ethnomusicology, and Society for Music Theory Conference

Many faculty and students from the Music Theory Department and the Musicology Department attended the combined conference of the American Musicological Society, Society for Ethnomusicology, and the Society for Music Theory (AMS/SEM/SMT), which was held in New Orleans on November 1–4, 2012.

Professor Roman Ivanovitch of the Music Theory Department was named the winner of the 2012 Marjorie Weston Emerson Award of the Mozart Society of America, for his article “Mozart’s Art of Retransition,” which was published in the journal Music Analysis in 2011. The award, honoring the outstanding scholarly article on Mozart published in English during the years 2010–11, was presented at a meeting of the Mozart Society during the New Orleans conference.

Several faculty and students presented papers at the conference:

Representing the Music Theory Department:

Professor Kyle Adams presented “A Preliminary Study of Articulation and Affect in Rap.”

Professor Frank Samarotto presented “The Trope of Expectancy/Infinity in the Music of the Beatles and Others.”

Diego Cubero, Ph.D. student in music theory, presented “The Fifth-Third-Root Paradigm and Its Prolongational Implications.”

Stephen Grazzini, Ph.D. candidate in music theory, presented “Hearing Improvisation in the French Baroque Harpsichord Prelude.”

William Guerin, Ph.D. candidate in music theory, presented “The Aesthetics of Fragility in Stylistic Signification: A ‘Gnostic’ Encounter with Beethoven’s ‘Heiliger Dankgesang.’”

John Reef, Ph.D. candidate in music theory, presented “The Two F-Major Fugues from The Well-Tempered Clavier: Dance Subjects and Their Phrase-Rhythmic Implications.”

Two music theory faculty served as session chairs for SMT: Professor Julian Hook chaired a session titled “Twentieth-Century Modernisms,” and Professor Marianne Kielian-Gilbert chaired a session on “Rhythm and Dance.”

Three students participated in Graduate Student Workshops at the conference. Devin Chaloux, Ph.D. student in music theory, participated in the workshop “A Corpus-Based Approach to Tonal Theory,” led by Ian Quinn of Yale University. Ruthie Chase, Ph.D. student in music theory, participated in the workshop “Harmony and Voice Leading in Rock and Pop Music,” led by Professor Walter Everett of the University of Michigan. Sara Bakker, Ph.D. candidate in music theory, was unable to attend the conference due to hurricane-related travel problems, but joined Professor Everett’s workshop by video.

Professor Eric Isaacson serves as Treasurer of SMT, and Professor Gretchen Horlacher is a member of the society’s Executive Board.

Representing the Musicology Department:

Professor J. Peter Burkholder participated as a panelist on “Charles Ives’s Fourth Symphony and the Past, Present, and Future of Ives Scholarship.”

Professor Judah Cohen served as a moderator at the combined meeting of the AMS Jewish Studies and Music Study Group and Society for Ethnomusicology Study Interest Group for Jewish Music.

Professor Halina Goldberg presented “Nationalizing the Kujawiak and Constructions of Nostalgia in Chopin’s Mazurkas.”

Professor Lynn Hooker served as the chair at the Music and National Identities discussion.

Jonathan Yaeger, Ph.D. candidate in Musicology, presented “The Challenges and Opportunities of the Stasi Archives.”

Travis Yaeger, Ph.D. candidate in Musicology, presented “The Quaestiones in musica, Rudolph of St. Truiden, and the Medieval Classroom.”

At the conference, Laura Youens, IU Musicology alumna, was awarded the Palisca Award (best edition or translation) for:  Thomasii Crequillonis Opera omnia. Vol. 18: Cantiones Quatuor Vocum, and Vol. 20: Cantiones Trium, Sex, Septem, et Duodecim Vocum, Corpus mensurabilis musicae 63, American Institute of Musicology, 2011.

On the evening of Saturday, November 3rd a combined Indiana University reception was well attended by an estimated 250-300 faculty, students, alumni, prospective students, and friends of three IU departments: the Departments of Music Theory and Musicology in the Jacobs School of Music, and the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Enjoy pictures from the reception

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Professors Horlacher and Kielian-Gilbert participate in “Reassessing the Rite: A Centennial Conference” at UNC

Igor Stravinsky

IU Jacobs School of Music faculty professors Gretchen Horlacher and Marianne Kielian-Gilbert recently presented conference papers at ”Reassing the Rite: A Centennial Conference,” a conference at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, Oct. 25-28, 2012.

This conference included 17 presentations that addressed the artistic impact of Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring in the history of Modernism, across the fields of music, dance and design. Participants included renowned dance historian, Lynn Garafola, and celebrated Russian music scholar, Richard Taruskin, who gave a keynote address on “Resisting The Rite”.

Conference presentations included:

  • Gretchen Horlacher:  “Rethinking Blocks and Superimposition: Form in the ‘Ritual of the Two Rival Tribes’”
  • Marianne Kielian-Gilbert: “Experiencing Sex-Gender Dissonance in The Rite”

The conference was held in conjunction with a thematically related conference at the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory in May 2013. The proceedings of the two symposia will offer material for an e-book edited by Professor Horlacher; Maureen Carr, a leading scholar specializing in Stravinsky’s compositional methods; and UNC Distinguished Professors Severine Neff and John Nádas.

The New York Times featured a review of the conference by James R. Oestereich on October 27, 2012 ‘The Rite of Spring’ Still Grist for Discussion
By JAMES R. OESTREICH

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

David Thurmaier receives Florida teaching award

David Thurmaier, Ph.D.’06, music theory, received the Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award in April 2012. He is currently assistant professor of music theory and head of academic studies at FGCU.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Roman Ivanovitch article published in “Music Analysis”

Associate Professor Roman Ivanovitch’s article “Mozart’s Art of Retransition” recently appeared in Music Analysis (Vol. 30/1, 2011).

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Professor Emeritus Lewis Rowell presents colloquium

On November 30, 2011, Professor Emeritus Lewis Rowell presented a colloquium, “Reflections on Tuning: Remarks, Opinions, and Sound Bites from a Skeptic,” at the music department of the University of California at Santa Barbara.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter