Quaternaglia, guitar quartet: a concert of Brazilian music and world premiers

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The Latin American Music Center in association with the IU Guitar Department will present on January 21st , at 8:00 PM in Auer Hall a guest artistic concert with the Brazilian guitar quartet, Quaternaglia. The program will feature US premieres and various music styles from Brazil.

Quaternaglia has been widely acclaimed as one of the world’s top contemporary music ensembles, after collecting prizes and recording unique albums. Formed by gifted Brazilian guitarists, Chrystian Dozza, Fabio Ramazzina, Thiago Abdalla and Sidney Molina, the quartet focuses on the expansion of the formation’s repertoire while presenting artistic excellence in their interpretations. Over the past twenty years, the ensemble has established a broad canon of original arrangements and new works by important Latin American composers, such as Leo Brouwer, Egberto Gismonti and Paulo Bellinati.

The work Maracatu da Pipa, by Paulo Bellinati will receive its US premiere in the concert; Bellinati (1950-) has become one of the most important Brazilian composers in the last two decades, the composer is also an active performer, arranger and musicologist. Kristen by João Luiz will also receive its US premiere.

 

 

Latin American Music Center Spring 2015 Course Offerings

The Latin American Music Center is pleased to announce its Spring 2015 course offerings. Contact your adviser to find out how a course from the Latin American Music Center fits into your academic program. For more details regarding these courses email us at lamc[@]indiana.edu or visit music.indiana.edu/lamc/education/

 

MUS-M 413 – Latin American and Latino Popular Music and Culture. Course is cross-listed with MUS-Z 413 and LATS-L 400

Meets:  Monday and Wednesday 6:45 pm-8:00 pm, Room M 344

Above class open to Undergraduate Music students only

Instructor: José Francisco Cortés-Álvarez

A survey of the popular and traditional musics of Latin America and the Latino population in the United States, from the late-19th century into the present. Through the course students engage with the geographical, historical, political, economic and social contexts within which each genre is produced and consumed, as well as the relevant composers, performers and instruments of each region and genre. Students from all disciplines may take the course to fulfill their individual major’s requirements. Activities outside class may be scheduled.

 

MUS-X 414 – Latin American Popular Music Ensemble (LAPME)

Meets: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00 pm-3:45 pm, and Friday 3:30 pm-6:00 pm. Room MA B012

Instructor: Daniel Duarte

Dedicated to the performance of Latin American repertoire, the ensemble explores original Latin American genres and their corresponding performance practices through arranging and performing pieces from both the popular and classical repertoire. The LAPME often receives as guests faculty from Indiana University in addition to having its own arrangers and composers in residency. The LAPME has its own performing library with original music and arrangements especially crafted for the ensemble.

Finals concert of the 5th Annual Latin American Music Recording Competition

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BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The Indiana University Jacobs School of Music’s Latin American Music Center (LAMC) presents the final round of the Fifth Annual Latin American Music Recording Competition, which will take place Sunday, February 1st, at 4:00 PM, at Auer Hall. This event is free and open to the public.

The LAMC received entries of the highest quality, and appreciates the time and effort invested in the submissions by the participating students. After careful deliberation, the competition committee chose three finalists, who will compete in the final round concert (in no particular order): harpist Emmanuel Padilla (student of Susann McDonald); Melos Saxophone Quartet (students of Otis Murphy); and trombonist Felipe Brito (student of Peter Ellefson).

The jury, which will be formed by IU-JSoM faculty members and distinguished members of the community, will pay close attention to the two aspects of the competition: a performance component, where competitors display their technical ability, knowledge of style, and artistic interpretation; and a research component, in which will be evaluated the search for repertoire from Latin American music provided in the competitors’ project. This year the final round features three centuries of Latin American music traditions, a blend of popular and classical music, and a collaborative work between interpret and award-winning composers creating new music written especially for the competition.

Past winners of the Latin American Music Recording Competition include 2014’s Bruno Sanchez (baritone) and Hanmo Qian (piano), 2013’s Nicholas Mariscal (cello), and 2012’s Daniel Inamorato (piano). As the prize, the winner will record a CD, fully produced by the Latin American Music Center’s production team and will perform a solo recital within the JSoM calendar of performances.

With the main objective of promoting the Latin American repertoire among gifted young artists while generating recordings that promote lesser known works from Latin America, the LAMC invites the IU and Bloomington community to the final round concert, which promises to bring together the best of Latin American art music, talent and creativity.

Latin music ensemble performs Christmas concert

By Alison Graham

 

Organizers of the Latin American Popular Music Ensemble hope to not only start the holiday season downtown Thursday night, but redefine what people think of as traditional holiday music.

The Ensemble will perform a Christmas concert 8 p.m. Thursday at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

The performance is open to everyone and will be in the Whikehart Auditorium.

The Ensemble is a course through the Jacobs School of Music that allows students to explore different genres of Latin music.

Ensemble Director Daniel Duarte said although the ensemble has been around for a while, this year is especially unusual because many of the students have signed up for the first time.

This semester is Duarte’s first year as director of the ensemble.

He was asked by the director of the Latin American Music Center, who oversees the ensemble, to serve as director for the ensemble. Duarte plans to stay on as director for the spring semester, as well.

This Thursday’s concert is Duarte’s debut as director.

“Audiences can expect a variety of music styles and music from different countries,” he said. “It will be a very diverse concert with many different 
instruments.”

Most of the pieces are original arrangements created by Ben Wedeking, a guitar associate instructor at the Jacobs School of Music, and Francisco Cortes, a composer and doctoral student in the Jacobs School of Music.

Wedeking said the biggest challenge for him was working with an ensemble of such a large size.

It’s his first time arranging for a large ensemble, and he had to work out problems that arose from his lack of experience, he said.

“I haven’t really done a huge amount of work in Latin music,” Wedeking said. “But I’ve had great help from Daniel (Duarte) and Francisco (Cortes).”

The Ensemble has been working three days a week for one to two hours. This week there will be more intense practices and dress rehearsals to prepare for the show and overcome 
challenges.

Arranging the pieces and teaching the students to perform them is a challenge itself, Duarte said.

“We have it in our mind how we want it to sound, put it on paper and then teach it to the students,” Duarte said. “They aren’t always familiar with it and have to learn about the history and the style beyond the notes they’re playing.”

In addition to arranging the pieces, Wedeking is also participating in a few aspects of the performance playing mandolin and 
guitar.

The Ensemble will perform traditional Christmas music, as well as new and less well-known music.

“I hope the audience can start to celebrate Christmas there,” Duarte said. “I hope they can have a beginning for the holidays and also learn about music and new styles.”

The performance will include music from different Latin American countries including Brazil, Colombia and Argentina.

They will also perform on a variety of instruments such as the harp, cello, guitar, mandolin and piano.

“In LAPME we try to cover several different genres of Latin music,” Wedeking said.

Wedeking became a part of the Ensemble for the first time this semester when a friend approached him and asked him to join.

He had previously worked with the Latin American Music Center events and with Duarte.

“I decided to come on board because I have a relationship with Daniel (Duarte) and to get experience with the ensemble and different genres of music,” he said.

 

© Indiana Daily Student 2014

Salón Latino features competition winners

By Audrey Perkins

 

The Latin American Music Center will host a Latin American chamber music concert 8 p.m. Thursday in Auer Hall.

The concert was scheduled to celebrate the release of a CD featuring Latin American Music Recording Competition winners.

Paul Borg, coordinator at the LAMC and adjunct professor of music at the Jacobs School of Music, called the CD “Minha Terra: A Collection of Brazilian Chamber Songs Based on Folk and Love Themes.”

“Minha Terra” means “my country” or “my land” in 
Portuguese.

For Borg, what sets this year apart are the performers.

Bruno Sandes, left, and Hanmo Qian recently won a recording competition, and will have a concert to celebrate the release of their new CD.

Bruno Sandes, a baritone, recently performed in IU Opera and Ballet’s “Italian Girl in 
Algiers.”

Borg said Sandes’ performance will make the event mostly because of the singer’s acting background.

“He engages the audience,” he said. “It’s as if he is singing right at you.”

The concert will feature students and faculty from the Jacobs School of Music, according to Jacobs release. They will perform a Latin American chamber music program.

Participants include recent winners of the Latin American Music Recording Competition, baritone Bruno Sandes and pianist Hanmo Qian.

Violist Gabriel Polycarpo, clarinetist Tiago Delgado, pianist Kaitlin Morton and violinist María José Romero Borg are set to play as well.

Attendees of the event will have something to look forward to aside from chamber music, Borg said.

“We’re gonna have a drawing to give away CDs,” he said.

Borg said the concert will last about an hour.

The majority of performers will be students, two of whom are competition winners. This year’s concert theme is Brazilian music.

The program also includes compositions by Heitor Villa-Lobos, José Siqueira and Edino Krieger of Brazil and Roque Cordero of Panama, according to the release.

Most music will be new compositions, Borg said.

As for the type of music people will hear, he referenced a song he will play, added that there will be a mix of upbeat and somber music.

“It has a little bit of both,” he said.

Latin American Music Center presents Salón Latino Oct. 16

Salon Latino-Spring 2014 final versionThe Latin American Music Center proudly presents its fifth chamber concert in the series “Salón Latino” on Thursday, Oct. 16, at 8 p.m. in Auer Hall. Admission is free.

The concert will feature students and faculty from the Jacobs School of Music performing an all-Latin American chamber music program. Participants include the most recent winners of the Latin American Music Recording Competition—baritone Bruno Sandes and pianist Hanmo Qian—and pianist Daniel Inamorato (2012 Latin American Music Recording Competition winner). Also participating are violist Gabriel Polycarpo, clarinetist Tiago Delgado, pianist Kaitlin Morton, violinist María José Romero, and faculty member Paul Borg, piano.

This event marks the release of the 2014 Latin American Music Recording Competition winners’ CD, featuring Sandes and Qian, “Minha Terra: A Collection of Brazilian Chamber Songs Based on Folk and Love Themes.” They will perform selections from the CD to close the concert.

The program also includes compositions by Heitor Villa-Lobos (Brazil), Roque Cordero (Panama), José Siqueira (Brazil), and Edino Krieger (Brazil).

Latin American Music Center Fall 2014 Course Offerings

The Latin American Music Center is pleased to announce its Fall 2014 course offerings. Contact your adviser to find out how a course from the Latin American Music Center fits into your academic program. For more details regarding these courses email us at lamc[@]indiana.edu or visit music.indiana.edu/lamc/education/

MUS-M 413 – Latin American and Latino Popular Music and Culture. Course is cross-listed with MUS-Z 413 and LATS-L 400

Meets:  Monday and Wednesday 6:30 pm-7:45 pm, Room M 242

Instructor: José Francisco Cortés-Álvarez

A survey of the popular and traditional musics of Latin America and the Latino population in the United States, from the late-19th century into the present. Through the course students engage with the geographical, historical, political, economic and social contexts within which each genre is produced and consumed, as well as the relevant composers, performers and instruments of each region and genre. Students from all disciplines may take the course to fulfill their individual major’s requirements. Activities outside class may be scheduled.

MUS-X 414 – Latin American Popular Music Ensemble (LAPME)

Meets: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00 pm-3:45 pm, and Friday 3:30 pm-6:00 pm. Room MA B012

Instructor: Daniel Duarte

Dedicated to the performance of Latin American repertoire, the ensemble explores original Latin American genres and their corresponding performance practices through arranging and performing pieces from both the popular and classical repertoire. The LAPME often receives as guests faculty from Indiana University in addition to having its own arrangers and composers in residency. The LAPME has its own performing library with original music and arrangements especially crafted for the ensemble.

MUS-M 690 cross listed with MUS-M 510 – Latin American Art Music in the long 19th century

Meets: Monday and Wednesday 9:45 am-11:00 am

Instructor: Paul Borg

The countries of Latin America share a musical heritage rooted in their common Colonial experience.  From initial contact around 1500 until independence in the early 19th century, music and the other arts exhibit a complicated relationship between Spanish and Portuguese traditions as practiced by European settlers and their descendants and indigenous traditions that were both repressed yet partially preserved.

This seminar is a survey of the music that survives from Colonial Latin America, tracing its stylistic changes in light of contemporary European practice and local uses.  Topics include surviving source materials, music’s function in the various strata of society, musical genres and their defining characteristics, musical instruments, and composers, performers, and audiences.  Coursework consists of assigned reading and listening, class discussion, an individual research project culminating in a paper and class presentation, and possible performance opportunity.

Jacobs School’s Latin American Music Center to receive IU award

The IU Jacobs School of Music’s Latin American Music Center staff.

The IU Jacobs School of Music’s Latin American Music Center staff.

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. – The Latin American Music Center at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music has received the university’s 2014 Latino Faculty and Staff Council Distinguished Group/Event Award for its events and concert series in the 2013-14 academic year.

The Latino Faculty and Staff Council Latino Awards recognize important contributions by Indiana University undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty and staff. Through these awards, the council wishes to distinguish and empower individuals whose efforts have contributed to a positive campus environment in tandem with helping support retention of Latinos at IU. The awards are also meant to highlight exemplary academic and professional work.

The Latin American Music Center will accept the award for Distinguished Group/Event for its participation in service, mentoring and promoting diversity initiatives that have enhanced and supported Latinos on campus. The award also recognizes individuals, groups or events that have developed awareness/programs in the area of culture, arts, health, economy, language or education.

“The LAMC team is quite honored to receive this important recognition, which we accept with great enthusiasm and humility,” said Erick Carballo, interim director of the center. “We have had an extremely productive year and are quite satisfied with both the continuation of well-established activities that the Bloomington community has come to expect and look forward to, and the introduction of new ones that have had a very warm welcome.”

Some of the center’s events include the Salón Latino–Chamber Music Series, focusing on chamber music from Latin America and initiated in 2012 during Carballo’s tenure, and the Annual Latin Valentine Concert. In its fifth edition, this year’s Valentine concert introduced Bloomington audiences to Latin American zarzuela—a staged musical theater genre of Spanish origin that found a receptive audience worldwide during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Other offerings include the Latin American Music Recording Competition, offered every spring and leading to a concert and a professionally produced CD recorded by the winner, and the Latin American Music Center Guitar Ensemble, featured every semester since the early 2000s with the Latin American Popular Music Ensemble and as an independent group.

In addition, the center’s Guest Lecture Series offers presentations from distinguished performers and scholars who come to visit the center, such as Fulbright Scholar and pianist Cristina Capperlli-Gerling, singer and guitarist Tomás Lozano, early music scholar David Castelo and Mexican guitar octect Sicarú.

The Latin American Music Center team will receive the award on Friday, April 25, at Oliver Winery.

¿Sabes qué? Latin American Rock and Nueva Canción

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The Latin American Music Center will present “¿Sabes qué? Latin American Rock and Nueva Canción” at 8:00pm on Thursday, April 10th, 2014, at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Performing Arts Center (on the corner of 4th St and Walnut). It is free and open to the public.

The Latin American Popular Music Ensemble, under the direction of Guido Sánchez-Portuguez, will perform original arrangements of classics from the Nueva Canción, Nueva Trova, and Latin Rock repertory. As an addition to the eclectic works the ensemble will also perform Brazilian choros, and Argentine Nuevo tango. The arrangements have been prepared for the unique instrument combination of the LAPME—guitar, piano, bass, percussion, flute, saxophone, trombone, and voice—by LAPME director Sánchez-Portuguez and current IU students Francisco Cortés-Álvarez and Bruno Cabrera.

Nueva Canción and Nueva Trova emerged during the 1960s and 1970s, coinciding with the peak of the American folk music revival. Latin American artists made us of traditional and folk music elements, in particular the specific rhythms, melodies, and instruments of traditional genres. Yet the highly poetic lyrics spoke of the social, political, and economic struggles, inequalities, and injustices of the oppressed classes. Nueva Canción artists were extremely influential for later generations of popular musicians, especially Latin Rock artists who continued to voice the struggles of the people through their lyrics.

The music presented in “¿Sabes qué?” draws a connection between the Nueva Canción and Nueva Trova artists, and their influence on more recent popular music and rock musicians throughout Latin America. The songs’ style and genres show the musical diversity of these movements, from tango to samba to landó to cumbia to Cuban son to rock.

It is free and open to the public holding tickets. Tickets will be available to the public 2 hours before the event at the Waldron Arts Center.

Salón Latino: March 27th, 2014

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The Latin American Music Center (LAMC) proudly presents its fourth chamber concert in the series “Salón Latino.” The event features some of the finest present and former students from the Jacobs School of Music, as well as invited guests, performing an all-Latin American chamber music program. Participants include the Hammond Piano Duo, Larchemere String Quartet, Yuriria Rodríguez, LAMC Chamber Musicians, visiting Brazilian scholar and pianist Cristina Capparelli-Gerling, and guest conductor Juan Felipe Orrego.

In celebration of the 95th birthday of the founder of the LAMC Professor Emeritus Juan Orrego-Salas, his son Juan Felipe Orrego will conduct one of his father’s most popular works: Canciones castellanas, Op. 20. Back in 1949, maestro Juan Orrego-Salas traveled from his natal Chile to Europe as a guest of the British Council and the French and Italian governments. On this tour he conducted the world première of his Canciones castellanas, which was selected for the XXIII Festival of the International Society of Contemporary Music (ISCM) held in Palermo and Taormina, Sicily.

In addition the LAMC will also present its latest recording project FireProof: Latin American Music for Two Pianos, recorded by the Hammond Piano Duo. The album features music for two pianos or four-hand piano by Latin American composers, including Roberto Cedeño (Venezuela), Francisco Cortés-Álvarez (Mexico), Alfonso Montecino and Juan Orrego-Salas (Chile), Ileana Pérez Velázquez (Cuba), and Astor Piazzolla (Argentina).

The program for this Salón Latino also includes compositions and arrangements by Ignacio Cervantes (Cuba), Paul Desenne (Venezuela), Guido Sánchez-Portuguez (Costa Rica), Gabriela Ortiz (Mexico), and Francisco Cortés-Álvarez (Mexico). The concert will take place in Auer Hall at 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, 27 March 2014. Admission to the concert is free.