18 and 20 November: Jan Herlinger on two gentlemen of Padua

 

Please join us on Monday, November 18, 2013, at 5:00 pm in the Lilly Library for “Marchetto and Prosdocimo: A Musician and an Astronomer on Music in Medieval Padua,” and on Wednesday, November 20, 2013, at 4:45 pm in Ford-Crawford Hall (Jacobs School of Music) for “Marchetto of Padua: The Legacy of a Fourteenth-Century Musician and Theorist.”

This is part of the interdisciplinary lecture series, Musica est ars sive scientia and in celebration of our 15th anniversary. The event is organized in collaboration with the Medieval Studies Institute. Special thanks to the Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study for their support and the Lilly Library for hosting our inaugural lecture.

All welcome. Refreshments will follow the talks. In order to prepare for these receptions we ask that you please fill out the small form available here if you are planning to attend.

Jan Herlinger is Derryl and Helen Haymon Professor of Music, emeritus, at Louisiana State University and an Adjunct Researcher at the University of Alabama School of Music. Professor Herlinger has edited, translated, and written widely on medieval music theory; he has contributed to the New Grove Dictionary of Music, the Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages, Medieval Italy: An Encyclopedia, the New Oxford History of Music, and the Cambridge History of Western Music Theory; and to the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Acta Musicologica, and Music Theory Spectrum He served as Secretary of the American Musicological Society, 1996–2001, and, from its beginning, as a member of the Board of the Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum, a project hosted by CHMTL.

ABSTRACTS

Marchetto and Prosdocimo: A Musician and an Astronomer on Music in Medieval Padua
Monday 18 November 2013 Lilly Library, 5:00 pm

Marchetto was a choirmaster in Padua in the early 14th century; Prosdocimo de Beldemandis an astronomer, physician, and professor of arts and medicine at the university in that city in the early 15th century. Both wrote extensively on music, covering many of the same topics (Prosdocimo wrote on arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy as well). Their music treatises are well known among students of medieval music and deemed essential for its understanding; but their experiences of music, their views of it, and their attitudes toward it were very different. The talk traces their differences—even conflicts—of opinion, and will include images of medieval manuscripts and audio clips of pieces each writer would have known.

 

Marchetto of Padua: The Legacy of a 14th-Century Musician and Theorist
Wednesday 20 November 2013 School of Music, Ford-Crawford Hall, 4:45 pm

The two major music treatises of Marchetto of Padua (fl. 1305–19) were pioneering in their treatment of rhythmic notation and highly innovative in their treatments of chromaticism, tuning, and mode. They were widely copied into late-medieval manuscripts, and ideas traceable to Marchetto pepper 15th-century Italian writings on music. His influence faded after 1500, when print replaced manuscript as the primary medium of dissemination. The talk traces the recovery of his theory from 1740 to the present, with particular focus on the roles of 18th- and 19th-century writers, including Charles Burney and Hugo Riemann. It will be illustrated with images of medieval manuscripts and documents from the 18th and 19th centuries.

download the abstracts here <

> download the poster here <

CHMTL announces new Lecture Series starting November 2013

In celebration of our 15th anniversary, we are pleased to announce the establishment of an annual interdisciplinary lecture series, Musica est ars sive scientia.

Since 1998, CHMTL has not only produced digital and print texts and resources to support the study of the history of music theory but also sponsored events for scholars to discuss these ideas. CHMTL also aims to foster the study of music theory in its interdisciplinary context: music’s role in social, religious, educational, and scientific thought from Late Antiquity to the early modern period. As we move into our next stage of development, with this lecture series we wish to encourage collaboration among scholars from multiple schools and departments within Indiana University interested in exploring the relationship of music to the liberal arts and sciences. Each year, CHMTL intends to invite a guest speaker to give two public lectures aimed at interesting scholars of both music and other disciplines and the general public as well.

Continuing last year’s collaboration with the Medieval Studies Institute, we are pleased to offer as inaugural lectures two talks by the renowned medievalist and musicologist Jan Herlinger, who will speak on the lives, works, and legacy of two important musical figures from late-medieval Italy: Marchetto of Padua and Prosdocimo de’ Beldomandi.

Please join us on Monday, November 18, 2013, at 5:00 pm in the Lilly Library for “Marchetto and Prosdocimo: A Musician and an Astronomer on Music in Medieval Padua,” and on Wednesday, November 20, 2013, at 4:45 pm in Ford-Crawford Hall (Jacobs School of Music) for “Marchetto of Padua: The Legacy of a Fourteenth-Century Musician and Theorist.”

All welcome. Refreshments will follow the talks. In order to prepare for these receptions we ask that you please fill out the small form available here if you are planning to attend.

Jan Herlinger is Derryl and Helen Haymon Professor of Music, emeritus, at Louisiana State University and an Adjunct Researcher at the University of Alabama School of Music. Professor Herlinger has edited, translated, and written widely on medieval music theory; he has contributed to the New Grove Dictionary of Music, the Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages, Medieval Italy: An Encyclopedia, the New Oxford History of Music, and the Cambridge History of Western Music Theory; and to the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Acta Musicologica, and Music Theory Spectrum He served as Secretary of the American Musicological Society, 1996–2001, and, from its beginning, as a member of the Board of the Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum, a project hosted by CHMTL.

Special thanks to the Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study for their support and the Lilly Library for hosting our inaugural lecture.

> download the poster here <

Abstracts

Marchetto and Prosdocimo: A Musician and an Astronomer on Music in Medieval Padua
Monday 18 November 2013 Lilly Library, 5:00 pm

Marchetto was a choirmaster in Padua in the early 14th century; Prosdocimo de Beldemandis an astronomer, physician, and professor of arts and medicine at the university in that city in the early 15th century. Both wrote extensively on music, covering many of the same topics (Prosdocimo wrote on arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy as well). Their music treatises are well known among students of medieval music and deemed essential for its understanding; but their experiences of music, their views of it, and their attitudes toward it were very different. The talk traces their differences—even conflicts—of opinion, and will include images of medieval manuscripts and audio clips of pieces each writer would have known.

 

Marchetto of Padua: The Legacy of a 14th-Century Musician and Theorist
Wednesday 20 November 2013 School of Music, Ford-Crawford Hall, 4:45 pm

The two major music treatises of Marchetto of Padua (fl. 1305–19) were pioneering in their treatment of rhythmic notation and highly innovative in their treatments of chromaticism, tuning, and mode. They were widely copied into late-medieval manuscripts, and ideas traceable to Marchetto pepper 15th-century Italian writings on music. His influence faded after 1500, when print replaced manuscript as the primary medium of dissemination. The talk traces the recovery of his theory from 1740 to the present, with particular focus on the roles of 18th- and 19th-century writers, including Charles Burney and Hugo Riemann. It will be illustrated with images of medieval manuscripts and documents from the 18th and 19th centuries.

download the abstracts here <

New and revised treatises added to TML

Four new treatises and six revisions have been added to Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum (TML).

This addition includes works by the Italian Prosdocimo de’ Beldemandis, the English John Dygon and the German Gallus Dressler.

The following texts are newly added in TML:

The following files have been updated with minor revisions:

Thanks to the University of Illinois Press for allowing reproduction of the texts edited by Theodor Dumitrescu, Robert Forgács, and Jan Herlinger, and to Magda Dragu, Chelsey Hamm, and Michael McClimon of CHMTL.

As always, we are pleased to receive suggestions, corrections, or questions.

 

Interdisciplinary Workshop: August 31 – September 1

SCHOLARLY EDITIONS AND THE DIGITAL AGE: TEXT AND MUSIC

An interdisciplinary workshop jointly organized by the Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature and the Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University

Indiana Memorial Union, Oak Room
Friday 31 August 2012, followed by a Study Day on Saturday 1 September


Digital editions have already begun to drastically change the work of scholars, but many questions of method, technology, academic recognition, remain open. This workshop will draw together scholars from a variety of fields to present and discuss their diverse experiences in digital scholarly publication, and aims to answer such questions as the following: what are the advantages of a digital edition, compared with a traditional one? How difficult is to create a digital edition today, and what type of collaboration between different scholars does it entail? Are the standard techniques used by scholars sufficient/suitable for all purposes? How are different fields (Literature, History, Music, etc.) benefiting or not benefiting from the possibilities of this new medium? Finally: are electronic editions advanced enough, and well-regarded enough by scholars and institutions to suggest that the age of printed editions is coming to an end?

The workshop will have a special, albeit not exclusive, focus on medieval and Early modern themes and materials. Some technical aspects will be illustrated, but the presentations will concentrate on general methodological approaches. On the following morning, Saturday 1 October, a more informal all-musicological Study Day will be held, organized by CHMTL. This is an opportunity to present and discuss new initiatives stemming from the Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum (the oldest of the projects hosted by CHMTL) followed by other presentations/responses and an open discussion/question time on digital applications to music studies.

Speakers:
Benjamin Albritton  (Stanford University)
Donald Byrd (IU, School of Informatics and School of Music)
Michelle Dalmau (IU, Digital Library Program)
Giuliano Di Bacco (IU, CHMTL)
Richard Freedman (Haverford College)
James Ginther  (Saint Louis University)
Clara Henderson (IU, Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities)
William Newman  (IU, History and Philosophy of Science)
Dot Porter (IU, Digital Library Program)
Perry Roland (University of Virginia)
Martha Nell Smith (University of Maryland)
H. Wayne Storey (IU, French and Italian)
John Walsh (IU, Library and Information Science)

The capacity of the venue is limited. Please register by emailing the dedicated address iuchmtl@gmail.com by 28 August. Please let us know if you plan to attend the panels of the Friday morning/afternoon and/or of the Saturday, and whether you can join us for lunch on Friday in the Tudor Room ($12). For more information, email gdibacco@indiana.edu.

Download the Schedule here (PDF)

The Workshop has been made possible thanks to a Workshop/Small Conference Grant of the Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study

CHMTL and MEST are delighted to welcome five guest speakers: 
Benjamin Albritton holds a PhD in medieval musicology, with a focus on the interplay of word and music in the fourteenth century. A Machaut specialist, his latest contribution is an essay in the Companion to Guillaume de Machaut (forthcoming by Brill). He has been a member of the board of directors of the International Machaut Society. As a digital humanities and manuscript studies scholar, he works as Digital products and services manager at Stanford University Library, where he is primarily responsible for a portfolio of projects on interoperability and the support of scholarly uses of medieval materials.
James R. Ginther is Professor of Medieval Theology and Director of the Center for Digital Theology at Saint Louis University. Ginther has been active in digital humanities for almost fifteen years and has developed searchable textbases, 3DRT models of historic sites of religious value and a digital edition of a medieval text.  His current project is T-PEN, a web-based tool that supports the transcription of unpublished manuscripts that have been digitized.  Born and raised in Toronto, Ginther gained his doctorate in Medieval Studies from the University of Toronto. He taught at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom before coming to Saint Louis in 2002.
Richard Freedman is John C. Whitehead Professor of Music at Haverford College.  His research on French and Italian music of the sixteenth century has appeared in major musicological journals and in his book, The Chansons of Orlando di Lasso and their Protestant Listeners: Music, Piety, and Print in Sixteenth-Century France (2001). He has just completed a new cultural history of Renaissance music for W. W. Norton.  His digital project on the chanson albums of Nicolas du Chemin combines his interests in the Renaissance chansons with some new tools for the study of musical texts, including an image archive, modern critical editions, reconstructions, and tools for collaborative research.
Perry Roland is Music Metadata Librarian at the University of Virginia Music Library where he participates in the creation of new digital resources and their metadata.  Perry holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Music Education from Concord College, Athens, West Virginia; a Master of Arts degree in Music Composition from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; and a Master of Science degree in Library and Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  Perry is the principal architect of the Music Encoding Initiative, a project aimed at creating a music notation model and tools for the musicological community.
Martha Nell Smith is professor of English in the University of Maryland. Far ahead of the curve on the possibilities of digitally-born critical inquiries, professor Smith has been leading the way toward a new age of textual scholarship and is considered a luminary in the world of digital humanities. An expert on the writings of Emily and Susan Dickinson, she begun the Dickinson Electronic Archives in 1997; in 1999 she founded the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities. Her latest contribution to digital scholarship is Emily Dickinson’s Correspondences: A Born-Digital Textual Inquiry (University of Virginia Rotunda Press, 2008).

Job opportunity: CHMTL searches for a Digital Projects Manager

CHMTL is pleased to announce the opening of a position of Web/Database Analyst in the Jacobs School of Music. The position will be initially as one-year appointment and the successful candidate will work half-time as CHMTL’s Digital Projects Manager (half-time as programmer for the Jacobs School of Music Information Technology Systems). More details on Jobs@IU.

New Frontiers Grant awarded to CHMTL for pilot project

CHMTL has been awarded a New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant, the major research grant program funded by Indiana University. The grant will allow us to begin a pilot project of new online editions and publications on the history of music theory.

CHMTL awarded funds from the Institute for Advanced Study

The Institute for Advanced Study at Indiana University has awarded CHMTL funds for the organization of a Workshop on “Textual and Musical Editing in the Digital Age,” to be held at the end of the summer of 2012. The workshop will be organized in collaboration with the Medieval Studies Institute.

CHMTL collaborates on award-winning new project

CHMTL announces its participation in a new collaborative project, “Musical Collectorship in Italy in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries,” proposed by professors Giovanni Zanovello and Massimo Ossi of the Musicology Department. This jump-start project will investigate a rich collection of manuscripts and early prints gathered by the music collector Giuseppe Greggiati, housed in the Italian city of Ostiglia. Initial support will be provided by Collaborative Research and Creative Activity Funding, through the Office of the Vice Provost for Research.

Rameau, Rousseau, and other new titles in TFM

Seventeen new treatises have been added to Traités Français sur la Musique (TFM).

This substantial addition includes works by Enlightenment thinker Jean-Jacques Rousseau, the composer and theorist Jean-Pillippe Rameau, and additional works on temperament, music and morals, dance, and acoustics.

Thanks to Rika Asai, Daniel Bishop, John Reef, Clinton Webb, Alexis Witt, and of course to Peter Slemon, director of TFM. The details follow:

18ème siècle:

 19ème siècle

Please note that the TFM Canon of Data Files is now available only in PDF form. As always, we are pleased to receive suggestions, corrections, or questions.

Eustache Deschamps, “L’Art de dictier” added to TFM

Eustache Deschamps, L’Art de dictier has been added to our collection of pre-1600 sources in Traités Français sur la Musique.

Thanks to Rika Asai, and of course to Peter Slemon, director of TFM.

As always, we are pleased to receive suggestions, corrections, or questions.